Weekly Presentations for Classical Conversations

IMG_6843

I have a love/ hate relationship with the weekly presentations for Classical Conversations. The day I’m helping my kids prepare their presentations (like today), I hate presentations. Every other day of the week, I love them, absolutely love them.

This week, my kids (nine and four), will be doing a presentation about a famous artist. They will have to give their class details about the artist’s life and works and the class will try and guess which artist they are talking about. My nine year old chose her own artist and she’s highlighting facts in a book about him as we speak. My four year old… well, it’s going to be a lot more difficult (for me) to help her prepare.  That said, whatever she ends up doing will be adorable and hysterical. It always is.

Classical Conversations is forcing us (me) to do a much better job in a lot of ways.  If it weren’t for Classical Conversations, my kids would never have to add final polish any of their work.  But CC forces us to try and master the basics of at least one topic each week well enough so that my kids can present that to their peers.  I see my kids getting better and better at standing still and speaking to a group of people with confidence.   This is especially true for my shy four year old.  Well, she used to be shy, but since we started Classical Conversations, I haven’t seen much evidence of that.  And that’s my point.

My kids are also creating some terrific artwork to go along with their presentations each week, artwork we will treasure for years to come. I tend to avoid messes, but on the day we are preparing presentations, anything goes because we have to do what’s necessary to make the whole thing come off.  Presentations are tough on me (and messy and a little stressful), particularly on the day when I am helping my kids prepare them. As a homeschooler, it would be easy enough for me to avoid all stress (and mess).  But, in the end, I always end up so glad that we are forcing ourselves to submit to the rigors of CC. In the end we find we are getting so much from our effort.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *